CLINICIANS

ACTIfit Surgical Technique

The device is intended for irreparable partial meniscus defects in the medial and lateral compartment. Only orthopedic/sports medicine surgeons experienced in treating patients with meniscal tears and who have received training on implanting the device should use the ACTIfit scaffold.

ACTIfit meniscal scaffold granted US FDA Breakthrough Designation.
The ACTIfit Procedure

ACTIfit is for surgeons experienced in arthroscopy and treating meniscal tears. If the initial meniscus lesion cannot be sutured (repaired), then damaged tissue is removed in much the same way as in a partial meniscectomy and cut back to an area with good blood supply.

Patient Selection
  • an intact meniscal rim
  • anterior and posterior horns present, to enable attachment of the ACTIfit scaffold
  • normal or normalized alignment
  • stable or stabilized knee
  • avoid large bucket-handle tears
  • for detailed inclusion/exclusion criteria
    Click Here to see ACTIfit IFU
The Procedure
  • The meniscal defect is evaluated
  • If the meniscal defect cannot be repaired, it is trimmed and prepared for ACTIfit implantation
  • The defect is measured and the Scaffold is trimmed to ensure a correct fit for the damaged area
  • The implant is then placed arthroscopically into the trimmed defect in the knee
  • Several suturing techniques can be used to secure ACTIfit to the remaining meniscal rim and posterior/anterior horns, such as all-inside, inside-out or outside-in. Suture preference depends on the surgeon and the location of the defect
  • Post-operative rehabilitation, to protect the newly formed tissue during the initial remodelling phase, must commence immediately as directed by surgeon and physiotherapist
Optimal pore structure provides a scaffold for new cell migration.
Compressibility, easy handling, and tear resistance allows surgeons to easily fix various defects.
Re-look demonstrates a newly generated meniscus.

Relook photo courtesy of Prof J Bellemans, University Hospital Leuven, Belgium.

Only orthopedic / sports medicine surgeons experienced in treating patients with meniscal tears and who have received training on handling the device should use the ACTIfit implant. The device is intended for partial meniscus defects. The anterior and posterior horn should be intact and the meniscus rim should be stable.

ACTIfit Six month re-look arthroscopy
VIDEO TO FOLLOW
Clinical Results

ACTIfit’s clinical body of evidence is based on more than 25 studies published in the peer-reviewed literature, and cited in over 100journal articles. The largest multicenter study to date with 5-year results has been recently published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine. Key clinicians from across the world have presented ACTIfit results in congresses and conferences over the last ten years.

Polyurethane Meniscal Scaffold for the Treatment of Partial Meniscal Deficiency: 5 Year Follow-up Outcomes
A European Multicentric Study

Cecile Toanen, MD, Aad Dhollander, MD, PT, PhD, Paolo Bulgheroni, MD, Giuseppe Filardo, MD, PhD, Stefano Zaffagnini, MD, PhD, Tim Spalding, MD, Joan Carles Monllau, MD, PhD, Pablo Gelber, MD, Rene Verdonk, MD, PhD, Philippe Beaufils, MD, PhD, Nicolas Pujol, MD, PhD, and Peter Verdonk, Md, PhD.

Investigation performed at the Orthopedic Department, Centre Hospitalier de Versailles, Le Chesnay, France.

Click here to see the AJSM publication of ACTIfit's 5-year results

The patient must have an intact meniscal rim, with anterior and posterior horns present, to enable attachment of ACTIfit. The procedure is performed arthroscopically, usually with spinal or general anesthesia. If the initial meniscus lesion cannot be sutured (repaired), then damaged tissue is removed in much the same way as in a partial meniscectomy and cut back to an area with good blood supply. For detailed inclusion/exclusion criteria See ACTIfit IFU.